Texas Prison Supervisor Resigns After Inmate Accesses Internet Porn

A Food Services Manager at the Wallace Pack Unit resigned after allegedly allowing an inmate access to pornographic images on a computer.

The Office of the Inspector General stated that an investigation was started in late September when the prison system’s internet security team was alerted to inappropriate activity on a food services computer at the Navasota prison.

An inmate gained access to the password to the computer and allegedly logged on to watch porn, including child porn.

Officials confiscate the computer and turned it over to forensics specialists and began interviewing everyone who had access to the system.

Investigators reported the prisoner admitted to surfing the web for porn. The inmate has not yet been charged with a crime as officials are still investigating to determine the age of the girl in one of the images. The other several hundred images did not involve children.

Texas Department of Criminal Justice spokesman Jeremy Desel stated the Food Services Manager allowed the password to become compromised.

Officials declined to say how the prisoner managed to get the supervisor’s password but, under questioning, the inmate admitted to it all, saying he’d begun sneaking online to get news from home – then realized he could view porn instead.

The inmate thought that private browsing would disguise the X-rated activity, but it still set off the prison’s computer monitoring system.

Viewing pornographic images or videos is not a crime unless a child is involved. However, offenders are banned from using computers that are connected to the internet.

It is not yet clear whether the inmate will be charged. Officials did not release the names of the inmate or the supervisor.

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